The best places to see and be seen with Santa in Chicago

By Jesse Wright | Staff Writer

Adults may dream of a white Christmas, but for many kids, the holiday evokes another color altogether as a trip to see the old man in red is almost compulsory. Luckily, children in and around the downtown area have plenty of options:

Water Tower Place

The shopping’s never been better at Water Tower Place, a Mag Mile institution, and this year just as in years past, Santa will be around to meet with kids and pets. Reservations are encouraged to avoid a wait and there are various theme nights—like pajama night—so be sure to scroll through the options to get the perfect fit. To find the best night for your schedule and to make a reservation, check www.celebrateyourholiday.com

The Driehaus Museum

This popular destination has added Sunday dates for Santa. Kids under 2 are free, tickets for kids up to 12 are $15 and adult tickets are $20. The tickets include activities like sing-a-longs, story times and family fun. Anyone interested should get tickets as soon as possible, as several dates have already sold out. For more information, check the museum website at http://driehausmuseum.org

Soldier Field Breakfast with Santa

For a full morning with the big man, why not sign up for breakfast with Santa at Soldier Field on Dec. 8? Adult tickets are $50, $25 for kids ages 4-12 and free for younger kids. The tickets include a train display, an ornament contest and a cookie decorating area for children. This event includes a toy drive, so be sure and bring a new, unopened gift for a child in need. For more information, call (312) 235-7063 or email SoldierFieldBistro@aramark.com

Shedd Aquarium Breakfast with Santa

The Shedd Aquarium is offering a full morning of fun with Santa every weekend leading up to Christmas. Ticket prices vary for members and non-members, but the event includes breakfast, crafts, a Polar Express train ride and parade, an aquatic presentation and more. For more information, visit www.sheddaquarium.org/

Macy’s State Street Santa Events

Breakfast no good? Well, Macy’s has the solution for parents who want more options. The State Street department store is offering breakfast, lunch and/or dinner to folks who need some variety in scheduling time to visit Father Christmas. The events run through the month. For more information, visit http://macysrestaurants.com

Skate with Santa at Maggie Daley Park

Anyone who wants to get the kids out and about could do worse than this free opportunity to get the kids out on the ice with Santa at Maggie Daley Park in the heart of the New Eastside. On Dec. 16, from 10 a.m. to noon, kids can lace up and hold hands with the jolly red elf. For more information, visit www.chicagoparkdistrict.com

Swissotel’s Santa Suite

The hotel admits their newly-renovated Santa Suite is over the top, so expect to be wowed on the 41st floor by sights, sounds and decorations. The suite is open through Dec. 23 and tickets begin at $15 for individuals, and family packs can be had for $40. For more information, visit www.swissotel.com

Other places to find Santa

If you still can’t get enough Santa, follow the merry fellow as he travels through Chicagoland and beyond. This month, Santa will be visiting a number of nearby suburbs, and families can visit him in a variety of places. For more information, check out www.santainchicago.com

Cloud Gate choirs set the soundtrack to the season

By Jesse Wright | Staff Writer

The Christmas season means cold weather, good family, friends, warm wishes and…music.

No matter the age, the political bent or, heck, even the religious beliefs of so many people, classic Christmas songs like “Silent Night” and “White Christmas” still strike a chord. In Chicago, these songs—as well as more modern fare—are best heard by the Bean, or Cloud Gate, in Millennium Park as part of the city’s annual Caroling at Cloud Gate program.

“I would just say Chicago is a fabulous city with so many fantastic artistic opportunities,” said Kayleigh Dudevoir. “Just go. It’s really fun to introduce yourself to music that’s less accessible and to learn more about what the city has to offer.”

Dudevoir should know—she is the executive director of the Chicago Chamber Choir, the group slated to perform at Cloud Gate Dec. 7. She offered a peek behind the scenes of the choir circuit, and she said her choir has been busy preparing for months. “Usually our official season begins in October, but we get Christmas requests as soon as mid-November,” she said.

This month at Cloud Gate, Dudevoir said guests can expect to hear a mix of Christmas music.

“Some traditional Christmas carols like ‘Silent Night,’ ‘Deck the Halls’ and so on, as well as Christmas-themed but not traditional carols” will be sung in the park, she said.

Dudevoir said the choir has been performing at Cloud Gate for several years—it’s her sixth season with the group—and she said it’s always enjoyable for the choir and for the attendees. “We’ve done a number of performances there and there are always lots of children,” she said.

Guests will bring hot chocolate to sip while they listen and, Dudevoir said, if it’s not too terribly cold, the choir tries to wear festive sweaters, so it’s not so formal.

The city invites folks to hear some of the best choirs in the city perform Christmas carols for free at Cloud Gate.

The Chicago Chamber Choir will kick off the December Cloud Gate events on Dec. 7. All performances begin at 6 p.m. and wrap up by 7 p.m. Admission is free. The other performances will be Dec. 12 and Dec. 14 at the same times. To check out the Chicago Chamber Choir, its website, www.chicagochamberchoir.org/season, includes all upcoming dates.

The Walnut Room adds a dash of magic to any meal

By Angela Gagnon | Staff Writer

 

What’s it like to dine in the Walnut Room during the holidays? Whether it’s your first time setting foot in the elegant 17,000 square-foot dining room located on the seventh floor of Macy’s Department Store on State Street, or you’re a seasoned veteran, a visit there will put you right in the holiday spirit.

The Walnut Room opened in 1905 and has become a cherished landmark in Chicago. Come holiday time, the Walnut Room is transformed into a festive wonderland with the famed 45-foot Great Tree as the centerpiece. Suspended from the ceiling, the iconic Great Tree is adorned with more than 2,000 ornaments and features thousands of sparkling lights.

“Dining in the Walnut Room during the holidays is a beloved Chicago tradition,” said Carolyn Ng Cohen, Director of Media Relations at Macy’s. “With already plenty of magic in the air inside Macy’s Walnut Room, princess fairies can make it even more special for believers of all ages.”

The Walnut Room fairy princesses come each year upon the arrival of the Great Tree to spread magic and Christmas cheer, flying in from the North Pole, Candyland, Sugarplum Island and other magical places. Dressed in gowns, the fairies will charm guests of all ages. By customer request, they’ll appear tableside, asking patrons to make a wish and sprinkle some glittery fairy dust to help the wish come true. You may even get a visit from the Fairy Snow Queen, Jade Nicole, who has been sharing her fairy magic with Walnut Room diners for over a decade.

Nicole first came to the Walnut Room 11 years ago as the Keeper of Christmas Wishes from the North Pole.

“Each day I would give children and adults the chance to make a wish with a little fairy dust and a magical song. Then, I would bring their magical wishes to Santa Claus,” said Nicole.

“Some wishes are simple—a toy or a present, but some wishes are much bigger—peace on earth, comfort for the sick, hope and happiness. I like to give everyone the chance to make three wishes,”  the Fairy Snow Queen said. “A wish for yourself, a wish for someone else and a wish for the world.”

“This will be our sixth year making our annual trip to the Walnut Room,” said New Eastside resident Elizabeth Johnston, who goes with her 6-year-old daughter Dillon and a group of friends. Their evening starts with a visit to Santa in Macy’s Santaland on the fifth floor, and then they head to the Walnut Room for dinner and fairy princesses.

“Our favorite thing about the whole experience is the fairy princess,” says Johnston. “It’s so cute to watch the little girls and boys admire her. It’s a heartwarming experience to say the least, which is what brings us back year after year.”

The Walnut Room menu includes both a Holiday Great Tree buffet offered daily, as well as a la carte options. Guests can also sample Mrs. Hering’s famous original chicken pot pie which features the same recipe that has been served since 1890. For more information about dining in the Walnut Room, including holiday hours and pricing, visit http://macysrestaurants.com/walnut-room/.

Navy Pier offers fireworks, music for New Year’s bash

By Elizabeth Czapski | Staff Writer

At midnight on New Year’s Eve, Navy Pier will put on a free fireworks show set to music.

Payal Patel, with Navy Pier’s media relations, offered a sneak peek of this year’s music selection. According to Patel, the soundtrack is put together by Navy Pier’s music program coordinator and other members of Navy Pier’s art, culture and engagement team.

Here are the 14 songs Navy Pier will use to bring the new year:

Auld Lang Syne – Mariah Carey

I Wanna Dance With Somebody – Whitney Houston

Good Feeling – Flo-Rida

Move Your Feet – Junior Senior

Give Me Your Love – Sigala

Give Me Everything – Ne-Yo & Pitbull

That’s What I Like – Bruno Mars

Lights Down Low – MAX

Freedom – George Michael

Sir Duke – Stevie Wonder

Shake A Tail Feather – Ray Charles

In The Midnight Hour – Wilson Pickett

Chicago – Tony Bennett

Sweet Home Chicago – Blues Brothers

The fireworks show will take place Jan. 1, 12-12:15 a.m., free, Navy Pier, 600 E. Grand Ave, 312-595-7437, navypier.org.

JELL-O’s edible slime a kids’ toy that’s also a treat

Staff reports

Slime isn’t just for fun–with JELL-O it’s also for food. Photo courtesy JELL-O.

 

Just in time for the holidays, New Eastside-based JELL-O introduced an edible slime last month, which comes in strawberry-flavored Unicorn and lime-flavored Monster varieties.

The slime is a toy as well as a snack for kids.

In recent years, slime has become a social media phenomenon, with more than 20 million slime-related posts on Instagram and thousands of “how to” slime videos on YouTube. Fans have embraced the squishy and stretchy toy as a fun and creative activity, and some studies even claim the sensation of slime improves positive feelings and relaxation. While do-it-yourself edible slime recipes are popular, there had not been an edible slime available from a national brand until now.

The edible slime launch comes on the heels of JELL-O’s summer launch of JELL-O PLAY, a new line of edible JELL-O products designed to inspire families to engage in free play and fun. The three JELL-O PLAY product lines can be molded, shaped, and built into whatever parents and kids can imagine, and are designed around themes that spark creativity, such as Ocean and Jungle. All items are available online and in national retailers, and have a suggested retail price under $5.

 

“JELL-O PLAY is all about encouraging and enabling bonding time between parents and kids,” says Michael Hartley, Senior Associate Brand Manager for JELL-O Play. “With new JELL-O PLAY Edible Slime, the entire family can have fun creating, stretching, and even eating slime.”

The colorful, edible and imaginative DIY slime experience is easy to make: simply add water to the pre-made mix to create slime that will drip, stretch, and conform to any shape families can imagine. Each canister of JELL-O PLAY Edible Slime makes two batches of slime, is 100 percent edible and washes away easily with soap and warm water.

 

JELL-O PLAY Edible Slime is now available for pre-order on Amazon.com with a suggested retail price of $9.99. The slime will be available in select retailers in December.

 

The Kraft Heinz Company is the fifth-largest food and beverage company in the world. A globally trusted producer of delicious foods, The Kraft Heinz Company provides high quality, great taste and nutrition for all eating occasions whether at home, in restaurants or on the go. The Company’s iconic brands include Kraft, Heinz, ABC, Capri Sun, Classico, Jell-O, Kool-Aid, Lunchables, Maxwell House, Ore-Ida, Oscar Mayer, Philadelphia, Planters, Plasmon, Quero, Smart Ones and Velveeta. The Kraft Heinz Company is dedicated to the sustainable health of our people, our planet and our Company. For more information, visit www.kraftheinzcompany.com

Best Holiday Lights in Chicago

By Elizabeth Czapski | Staff Writer

Millennium Park

The first official lighting of the Millennium Park tree took place on Nov. 16, and the tree will remain lit until Jan. 6. This year’s tree is a 60-foot Norway Spruce from Elmhurst, according to the city’s website, and is the city’s 105th City of Chicago Christmas Tree. Enjoy the tree’s colorful lights, then visit Millennium Park for more winter magic or Maggie Daley Park for ice skating.

Michigan Avenue

Michigan Avenue’s lights will stay on throughout the holiday season. Take a stroll down and do some window shopping while enjoying the festive decorations on the trees and buildings along Michigan Avenue.

The Walnut Room and windows at Macy’s

Macy’s famous Walnut Room was the first-ever restaurant opened in a department store. The seventh-floor establishment hosts a famous holiday tradition: The 45-foot Great Tree displayed in the center of the room. Visit just to see the tree, or go to the restaurant for the Holiday Great Tree Buffet, offered all day through Jan. 6. Check out Macy’s colorful holiday window displays, which create magical scenes of winter wonderlands and the North Pole, before going up to the restaurant. Visit Macy’s at 111 N. State St.

Lincoln Park Zoo

The ZooLights at Lincoln Park Zoo make up some of the city’s most spectacular lights displays and you can visit the animals while marveling at the colorful lights all around the zoo. Strolling through the zoo would make for a great date night or be fun for the whole family! Zoo admission is always free. Visit through Jan. 6, 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., at 2001 N. Clark St.

Museum of Science & Industry

The museum’s Christmas Around the World Exhibit features over 50 trees representing global holiday traditions. Each tree is uniquely decorated with ornaments that reflect a different country’s customs. In the center stands the grand tree, four stories tall and bathed in a stunning display of lights. Visit between 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. This is included with museum admission, children 11 and under $12.95, adults $21.95, Museum of Science & Industry, 5700 S. Lake Shore Drive.

Allstate CTA Holiday Train & Bus

Chicago’s public transportation system is not immune to the spirit of the holidays. The traditional holiday train, decorated with holiday lights and candy canes, began running Nov. 23.This year, the CTA has added an extra holiday train called the “Elves’ Workshop Train.” The ‘L’ train will be decked out with festive decorations and Santa will make an appearance. A CTA Holiday Bus will also be driving around the city for a trackless transportation experience. This runs through December. See transitchicago.com/holidayfleet for a schedule.

A look inside the windows: The News gets a closer look at the Macy’s Christmas displays

Amelia Mehring poses with her grandfather, Aqui Rivera at the Macy’s window.

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

 

The weather’s cold. Snow flurries dance through the crisp air.

And even so, a crowd of people gathers on State Street, pausing to peer into a window, to catch a glimpse of Santa.

It’s the Macy’s window displays and they are working their annual magic.

For locals, there is plenty in downtown that gets, well, regular. There’s no reason to visit the Bean every day. Few locals take selfies with the skyline.

But the windows at Macy’s attract the tourists and the Chicagoans alike because whether it is a first-time visit or a longtime tradition, there’s something in those windows everyone wants to see.

“We come every year,” said Karen Rivera, who visited the windows with her husband, Aqui and their granddaughter, Amelia Mehring.

“We used to bring her father, when he was a boy,” Karen explained.

But what most people don’t see—what they can’t see—is the planning. Brian Peluso is the store’s visual manager and the man behind the windows and even though Christmas window displays take up a small amount of time and space in the Macy’s year, there’s a big deal. It’s a lot of work getting folks coming back, year after year, for generations.

“The planning and execution process can take anywhere from nine months to a year,” Peluso wrote in an email. “Usually once the holiday windows are unveiled for the season, the brainstorming begins for the next year’s windows.”

Macy’s of course is a chain, so the store on State Street is part of a larger, national conversation that includes things like themes. After the stores agree on a look, the decorations are shipped out.

“This year’s window displays were packed and shipped in 20 pallets/crates made up of 15 double length and five standard sized skids,” Peluso wrote. “Also, we typically use about 50-60 pounds of fake snow in each year’s displays.”

The installation team is four or five people and then Peluso’s visual design team includes four people and they add the finishing touches.

When Peluso is designing the windows, he has to bear in mind the history of the tradition. He explained the store has offered displays since the 1870s—and over those years, they have developed a reputation.

“Macy’s was the first store to feature holiday windows created for the pure fun and joy of the season and, with that, began a tradition that still lives on today in numerous cities including New York, Chicago, Boston, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Salt Lake City,” Peluso wrote. “In Chicago specifically, we’re celebrating the 51st anniversary of our annual holiday window display at Macy’s on State Street.”

This doesn’t mean the display itself is old. While some of the iconography like Santa may remain consistent, Peluso said the general themes do change.

“Each year a few new elements are added,” he said. “This year, we are excited to continue to celebrate all the Reasons to Believe.”

Besides that, each window has its own theme and color palette though there is at least one constant feature used to tie the all the displays together visually.

“Borders are placed around the windows to add to the overlying theme and to reflect Macy’s particular branding style,” Peluso said.

Pelusa said so much work and care goes into the windows, he understands why they attract people. There’s a lot to take in and he has some advice on how to do it right.

“There are so many meticulous details in each window — from the sculpting of the caricatures, to the props, to the backdrops and more,” he wrote. “I’d recommend that viewers get up close to the glass and look at every inch. Then step back, so they’ll see the small details start to pop out, showing how exciting the entire window is.”

Finally, for anyone looking to spruce up their own windows—or a room in their home—with Christmas spirit, Peluso has some advice.

“A good tip that I would recommend to anyone decorating their home for the holidays is that lighting and color go a long way, but when you add music plus a fragrance, such as a candle or potpourri, the decorations become even more captivating since they will touch on all your senses,” he wrote.

Check out the window displays through Christmas at 111 North State St.

A closer look at the Chicago Thanksgiving Parade

By Elizabeth Czapski, Staff Writer

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade has been bringing joy to residents for decades. The event started in 1934 as a way give people a little happiness during the Great Depression and this year’s parade promises to be as joy-filled and as fun as ever, with a few modern flourishes.

What’s new…

Viewers should tune in on time because right in the very first hour of the Uncle Dan’s Outdoor Store Thanksgiving Parade will feature a performance by the Black Ensemble Theater. The performing arts group will offer a preview performance of their “Women of Soul” production, which runs through Jan. 13. The performance will include a special salute to Aretha Franklin as well as a celebration of some of the biggest stars of soul.

What’s returning…

Every parade features familiar balloons, floats and music. But how many have Wookies?

Yes, the The 501st Legion – Midwest Garrison is back again. In late October parade officials announced the return of the largest Star Wars costuming club in the area.

The star warriors will be joined in the parade by another group of relics—knights. Returning this year will be Medieval Times’ Knights of the Realm.

Also returning is the The Southland College Prep band, a college band that formed in 2010. The band has grown in recent years and is now considered one of the premier marching bands in the parade, boasting 100 members with 25 dancers to boot.

Speaking of bands, local favorite Kelly High School Marching Trojans will return to perform their 2018 winter festival show.

The grand marshal…

While this year’s grand marshal had not been announced by press time, Chicagoans and parade fans can expect the marshal to be beloved and a part of the city’s history. Past marshals have included Ronald McDonald (2017) (the company is headquartered in Chicago),Chicago native and actor Matt Walsh (2016) and Chicago native and wrestler CM Punk (2012).

For a complete list of what to expect, check out the parade website, www.chicagothanksgivingparade.com.

Behind the scenes…

Of course, there is more to the parade than the floats and smiles most people see. Amanda Caswell, who does public relations for the Chicago Thanksgiving Parade, provided some of the parade’s fun facts. Here’s a look behind the scenes at the parade:

In 2014, 400,000 people attended the parade — that’s almost equivalent to the entire population of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

That year, 2,500 gift bags were handed out.

There are 5,280 feet in the parade route, which is exactly one mile.

It’s a global phenomenon with 19 states, 16 countries and 23 different cultural groups were represented in the 2014 parade, making it a true international affair. Thanks to television coverage, the parade is annually available to approximately 80 million homes and viewed by millions around the world. In addition, many visitors come from around the world, from places like Switzerland, Mexico, Australia, Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Canada and beyond.

According to media reports of last year’s parade, there were around 5,000 parade participants, 1,300 volunteers, 15 floats of all kinds and 18 marching bands, according to numbers from Thrillist, the Chicago Tribune, and Patch.com.

Finally, about 200 people handled the parade’s balloons in the 2014 parade, and those balloons were filled with 39,500 cubic feet of helium.

For the record, in 2014 there were 70 members of the “poo crew,” who ensure State Street would not smell like manure after the parade was over.

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade will take place on Nov. 22, 8–11 a.m. on State Street from Congress to Randolph. Don’t want to leave the house? Anyone can watch the parade live on WGN America and WGN9.

If you go…

Leave early and plan well. Streets will be blocked off for the parade route and parking will be tough, so give yourself lots of time. Public transportation will be running, though on a holiday schedule so if you take a train, check the schedule.

If you want a front row seat on State Street, good luck and set the alarm. It’s best to arrive by 7 a.m. to claim a spot, though there are usually spaces near State and Van Buren not too far from the Harold Washington Library. Expect train noise around that area.

 

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade provided statistics from the 2014 event. Updated stats will be available after this year’s parade.

Swan Lake enchants at the Auditorium Theater

By Elizabeth Czapski | staff writer

The Joffrey Ballet’s opening performance of Swan Lake at the Auditorium Theater in October offered Christopher Wheeldon’s elegant and thought-provoking reimagining Peter Tchaikovsky’s classic ballet.

Wheeldon’s Swan Lake first premiered with the Joffrey in Chicago in 2014 and became one of the Joffrey’s best-selling productions, according to a press release from the ballet company. Now the production has returned to Chicago.

According to the press release, Wheeldon’s vision was influenced by the paintings of Edgar Degas, who was a contemporary of Tchaikovsky and painted ballerinas at the Paris Opera. The program explains Degas also painted ballet patrons, who were assumed to be interested in ballerinas beyond their careers.

Wheeldon’s Swan Lake is set in 19th-century Paris and presents a ballet-within-a-ballet; the Paris Opera is putting on a production of Swan Lake, and a wealthy patron enters the picture, chatting with some of the ballerinas. The principal dancer, who plays Siegfried in the opera’s production, becomes suspicious of the patron’s intentions. Eventually, the principal dancer is consumed by the dances he is rehearsing—fantasy and reality blend together—and he becomes Siegfried, and the story of Swan Lake begins.

The suspicious patron in Wheeldon’s Swan Lake becomes the evil sorcerer Von Rothbart in the principal dancer’s fantasy, creating another remarkable connection to Degas’ artistic themes.

The dancers deliver the story with passion, grace, precision and stunning athleticism, transitioning flawlessly from scene to scene, emotion to emotion. Sorrow turns to love, turns to playfulness with incredible expression. A can-can and strip tease from cabaret dancers provides a light-hearted moment in Act III. The Chicago Philharmonic, conducted by Scott Speck, pulls the audience into the story through the score.

The costumes and set design are nothing short of magical and recall Degas’ paintings.

The Joffrey’s Swan Lake is an outstanding ballet that is not to be missed. The show runs Oct. 17-28 at the Auditorium Theater of Roosevelt University at 50 E. Congress Parkway. More information at joffrey.org.

Haunting haunts: The scariest places in town

By Taylor Hartz, Staff Writer

Fort Dearborn at Wacker Drive and Michigan Avenue

The site once known as Fort Dearborn is said to be the oldest haunted spot in Chicago.

During the war of 1812, the intersection of Wacker Drive and Michigan Avenue was filled with American soldiers when the Pottawatomie attacked—killing 148 people, including 12 children.

Legend has it that people can photograph ghostly beings at the spot, so be sure to snap a few and look closely.

The Chicago River near Clark Street Bridge

The Chicago River may be haunted by the souls of more than 800 men, women and children who lost their lives aboard the sunken Eastland steamship in 1915.

One of Chicago’s most infamous tragedies happened on July 24, when 2,500 employees of Western Electric, their families and friends boarded the S.S. Eastland for the company’s fifth annual employee picnic.

Shortly after families boarded the ship, it rolled over into the water between Clark Street and LaSalle Street – 844 people, including 22 entire families, never made it out of the water alive. In the century since, many have reported seeing apparitions in the area.

Congress Plaza Hotel

Last year, Travel & Leisure named New Eastside’s Congress Plaza Hotel the most haunted spot in Illinois.

One of the hotels most notorious guests was gangster Al Capone and some say he may have never left as reports say he can still be seen strolling the halls.

Capone isn’t alone. The ghost of a murdered homeless man, “Peg Leg Johnny,” is said to reside in the Congress as well and is fond of playing with light switches to spook guests.

Another man’s ghost is said to roam the hotel’s eighth floor, reports say, where the elevator often stops even when no one—at least no one visible—has pushed the button.

Finally, a woman is said to haunt room 441, where multiple guests have reported seeing a shadowy outline of her body.

Chicago Water Tower

Streeterville’s iconic Chicago Water Tower is most famous for its breathtaking architecture, and for surviving the Great Chicago Fire in 1871. But the structure may have been the site of a man’s death, too.

According to legend, one employee of the water tower stayed behind to operate water pumps as the Chicago Fire raged closer. To save himself from burning to death, the man is said to have hung himself on the top floor of the tower. Many have spotted the silhouette of his body hanging in the window above the Magnificent Mile.

Published October 2, 2018

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