Governor Pritzker and Mayor Lightfoot launch Arts for Illinois Relief Fund

By Daniel Patton, April 2, 2020

 

The City of Chicago, the State of Illinois and the broader philanthropic community are teaming up to provide financial assistance to artists, artisans and cultural organizations impacted by COVID-19.

Launched April 1, the Arts for Illinois Relief Fund (AIRF) is a statewide initiative that began accepting grant applications “for artists, artisans and cultural organizations” April 1,  according to a press release from the Mayor’s office. Funded by public and private sources, it has received $4 million in commitments to date.

“The arts and cultural community is deeply embedded in the fabric of Chicago. Our cultural institutions – from the one-room artist studio to the 1,500-seat theater – employ artists, back office staff, ushers, curators, ticket takers and others,” said Mayor Lori Lightfoot and First Lady Amy Eshleman. “Many artists supplement their work by providing arts education in our schools. All of these individuals contribute to the City’s vibrant arts and cultural sector, which has been temporarily halted.” 

Eligible disciplines include dance, film & media arts, interdisciplinary, literary arts, music, teaching arts, theater, and visual arts and design. To learn more about how individuals as well as organizations can receive funding, visit artsforillinois.org/donate-and-apply

AIRF financial contributors to date include the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs (DCASE), Walder Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and more than a dozen additional funders. 

The effort’s ongoing fundraising activities will be co-chaired by First Lady MK Pritzker and First Lady Amy Eshleman, with support from other civic leaders, according to the release. Individuals, corporations and charitable foundations are encouraged to donate to the Arts for Illinois Relief Fund by visiting www.artsforillinois.org.

Second City goes live online via Zoom

By Daniel Patton, April 1, 2020

 

Chicago’s Second City will soon deliver its award-winning humor to homes around the world, according to a news release. At 7 p.m. on April 2, the famed 60-year-old Chicago institution will begin live-streaming entertainment, education and business content directly to virtual audiences online via the video conferencing app, Zoom.

The program will kick off with “Improv House Party,” an interactive performance featuring “co-quarantined pairs (who) convene digitally to improvise their hearts out in this wild west of comedy streaming live from everyone’s bunker.” Second City cast members starring in the performance will connect, engage, and accept suggestions from the virtual audience during the show.

To register for the Zoom show, click here.

 

See how well our work translates
According to The Second City CEO and executive producer Andrew Alexander, the institution’s renowned methodology is a perfect fit for modern technology.  

“It’s incredible to see how well our work translates to this platform,” he said. “There are so many people who have yet to experience The Second City, and it’s so rewarding to our talent and staff to get back to work online and give the world a taste of what we do.”

Vice President of Production Jen Hoyt agreed.

“We don’t know when we’ll be able to welcome an audience back into our theaters, so we’ve had to improvise on a whole new scale,” she said. “We can actually offer audiences at home live, interactive performances featuring the world’s best improvisers.”

The events will be streamed for free, but donations will be accepted to The Second City Alumni Fund, a resource for performers and other members of The Second City community experiencing critical health and financial challenges, according to the release.

For more information about The Second City, including The Second City Training Center and Second City Works, click here. Follow The Second City on social media for information on future shows: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or at secondcity.com.

 

Image: from pngtree.com.

Governor Pritzker extends stay-at-home order through April

March 31, 2020

 

Illinois’ current stay-at-home order will be extended through the month of April to help curb the spread of coronavirus.

The proclamation was made by Governor JB Pritzker during his daily #COVID19 briefing on March 31. It adds a month to the original order that he issued on March 20.

“I have let the science guide our decisions and I’ve relied upon the top medical experts, scientists, public health researchers, epidemiologists, mathematicians and modelers, from the greatest institutions in the world whose guidance on infection rates and potential mortalities and protective measures is second to none,” he said. “Illinois has one of the strongest public health systems in the nation — but even so, we aren’t immune to this virus’ ability to push our existing capacity beyond its limit. We need to maintain our course and keep working to flatten the curve.”

The extension also applies to the temporary statewide closure of all K-12 schools that the governor ordered on March 13, two days before he announced a prohibition on in-person dining in restaurants throughout the state.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot — whose efforts to combat the virus include closing the city’s lakefront and launching a plan to house the infected in hotel rooms — acknowledged the hardship of the order while expressing her support for the governor’s actions.

“This may not be the measure that we like, but it is the measure we all need to combat the deadly and growing COVID-19 crisis,” said Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot.”The City of Chicago fully supports Governor Pritzker’s bold and necessary extension of the Stay at Home Order, and stands ready to partner with the State and our health officials as we navigate the challenges that lie ahead in safeguarding our residents. We will get through this crisis together and I want to thank all those who have been doing their part.”

Chicago launches bold plan to curb spread of COVID-19

 

Downtown Chicago’s lakefront and parks closed
When sunny spring weather caused crowds to gather on the lakefront, Mayor Lori Lightfoot ordered that the lakefront, beaches, parks and the 606 be closed March 27 for an unspecified time to curb the spread of coronavirus. Chicago police patrolled the area to clear crowds and some areas have been fenced off.

 

Window washing essential
Spring window washing is going ahead as planned in the neighborhood. Window washing crews have been observed by residents at several buildings in New Eastside including 155 N. Harbor Dr. and 201 Westshore Dr. in New Eastside, causing residents to hastily draw their blinds.

 

COVID-19 in New Eastside
In March, cases of COVID-19 rose in New Eastside. Cases COVID-19 have been reported in the Prudential, Aon Center, Aqua and Lancaster buildings. Building managers sent notification of reported cases to tenants and residents via emails.

 

Chicago Park District Programs go online
Chicago Park District is bringing the fun to you. Children’s storytimes, make a baby Yoda art project, and video tips on how to keep your house squeaky clean while burning calories are coming to you online via the Chicago Park District Programs website. Visit chicagoparkdistrict.com/stayingactive for a list of their offerings: from bingo boards for download to virtual meditation and ballet videos.

 

Chicagoans come together in sing-alongs
Throughout the stay-at-home order, Chicagoans have found a way to cheer themselves up. Sing-alongs organized via social media platforms have filled the air with Bon Jovi’s “Livin’ on a Prayer” which drew 8,200 virtual attendees and likely more at the actual event on their balconies and at their windows at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 21. The event caught the attention of Jon Bon Jovi himself, who dedicated an Instagram post to the city, “I am with you with all my heart and my soul, sending my love to everybody in Chicago and across America.”

The radio station 97.1 The Drive put together their own sing-along of the National Anthem and Queen’s “We Will Rock You” March 27. A singalong, especially for kids took place, Sunday March 29 at 5p.m. with a chorus of “Let It Go” from the Disney movie “Frozen.”

These events tend to pop up sporadically and at last minute notice. To take part in upcoming singalongs, please follow New Eastside News’ Facebook page, where we will be reposting the events as they are announced. 

 

2020 election wrap-up
Democrats claiming victory after the 2020 Illinois Primary elections include incumbent Sen. Dick Durbin, who will run against Republican challenger Mark Curran in the November general election. Incumbent State’s Attorney Kim Foxx will face Republican challenger Patrick O’Brien. Incumbent Rep. Danny K. Davis will run against Republican Craig Cameron for the Seventh District, which includes New Eastside, Streeterville and the West Loop.

 

New Eastside and Streeterville political races to watch
Unless a challenger emerges, incumbent State Sen. Robert Peters will run unopposed in the race for Senate District 13, which includes Streeterville and everything east of Columbus Dr. in New Eastside. The same holds true for incumbent Kambium Buckner, who won the primary for House District 26. Lamont Robinson ran unopposed and won the primary for State House District 5, which includes everything west of Columbus Dr. in New Eastside, all of River North, and the eastern half of the Loop.

 

City suspends late fees on parking tickets and more
On March 18, Mayor Lightfoot announced that the city has initiated several “hold-harmless policies” to ease the burden caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. Effective immediately, Chicago will stop charging late fees on payment plans, utility bills, parking tickets, red-light citations, booting and other violations. “This is a common sense way that we can help mitigate the burdens and pressures many are feeling,” Lightfoot said. “We know that these practices disproportionately impact the residents that are most in need during this crisis.” The policies will remain in effect until April 30.

 

City rents hotel rooms for people with coronavirus
Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s office said certain people who test positive for coronavirus or are awaiting test results would be housed in hotel rooms rented by the city beginning March 23. The measure will apply to those “who cannot safely return home (but) do not need hospital care.” At the time of the announcement, the city had already reached agreements with local hotels to provide more than 1,000 rooms for those “exposed to or mildly ill with COVID-19.” According to the Chicago Tribune, the program could expand to include up to 4,000 hotel rooms costing nearly $175 per night, and the expense will be covered by “federal funds and other potential sources.”

 

How to give back in the neighborhood
In a recent email newsletter, Alderman Reilly thanked the community for their enquiries into how to give back locally in the time of the coronavirus pandemic. There are many ways to help.

  • CPS teachers or childcare providers are welcome to sign up with Sittercity. Sittercity will match sitters to care for children of first responders and healthcare workers, as both are welcome to access the site for free. Visit sittercity.com for more information.
  • CPS nurses or healthcare providers, including retired healthcare workers and those with out-of-state medical licenses, can sign up for the Illinois Medical Reserve Program. The IMRS is in need of volunteers to help support the healthcare field at this time. For more information, visit illinoishelps.net.
  • The country is also in a blood donation shortage and the Red Cross is asking for more donations. If you are eligible, visit redcross.org.
  • For those who are unable to leave their homes or food insecure, there are several Chicago organizations that could use help and donations. One of which is Greater Chicago Food Depository. They are looking for volunteers ages 18-60 at chicagosfoodbank.org.
  • Please keep in mind if you have exhibited symptoms of the coronavirus or come into contact with someone who has exhibited symptoms or been diagnosed in the last 14 days, you should stay at home and not locally volunteer. For more information visit ward42chicago.com

 

Deals on Divvy
It’s a good time to get a deal on Divvy. To help ease the burden of Illinois’ stay-at-home order, the City of Chicago has arranged a deal to reduce the cost of renting Divvy bikes. The cost of an annual Divvy membership has been reduced 50% — from $99 to $49.50 —The “steeply” discounted memberships are available through April 30, 2020.

Other two-wheeled measures include reducing the regular $3 cost of 30-minute Divvy bike rentals by 66%, which comes out to a dollar for a half hour.

“Chicago is committed to ensuring reliable and accessible transportation for every neighborhood and community,” said Mayor Lori Lightfoot in a press release, “We are taking every measure possible to provide the pricing support needed to keep our residents mobile and our city moving forward.” Divvy is also launching a 30-day program to give critical healthcare workers free bikeshare rides.

 

Local grocery stores enact dedicated hours for senior citizens
Seniors, and those with underlying medical conditions, are at the most risk for serious coronavirus complications, according to the CDC. To make essential trips to the grocery store and pharmacy easier for those individuals that are most at-risk, local stores have enacted senior-specific hours.

  • Whole Foods, 255 E. Grand: Those 60 and up can begin shopping at 7a.m., before the store officially opens at 8a.m.
  • Whole Foods, 30 W. Huron: Those 60 and up can begin shopping at 8a.m, before the store officially opens at 9a.m.
  • Target, 401 E. Illinois St.: Each Wednesday, the first hour of shopping is dedicated to seniors and those with underlying health concerns. 7-8a.m.
  • Mariano’s, 333 E. Benton Pl.: 6-8a.m. is reserved for senior citizens and those with underlying health concerns.
  • Jewel-Osco, 550 N. State St., For seniors and those with underlying health concerns, priority will be given on Tuesdays and Thursdays 7-9a.m.
  • Walgreens: 8-9a.m. on Tuesdays is senior shopping hour.

 

CTA, Metra help to ease COVID-19 burden
Starting on March 24, The Chicago Transit Authority offered partial credit to customers who purchased fare cards but were unable to use them due to the coronavirus.

“A one-time credit,” according to a CTA press release, applies to “any remaining days left on an active 7- or 30-day pass.” In other words, a person who purchased a 7-day pass but only used it for one day would be credited with six days of “Transit Value” that would be “added to the cardholder’s Ventra account.”

The CTA also offered reassurance that it will continue operations during the stay-at-home order. Medical personnel also get free rides at this time.

 

McCormick Place transforms into makeshift hospital
Plans are underway to turn McCormick Place into a 3000 bed makeshift hospital to treat coronavirus patients by April 24. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is providing kits help transform several exhibition halls in the facility into a temporary medical site.

 

Northwestern Memorial Hospital restricts visitors
In an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19 there is a new no-visitor restriction at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. According to the hospital’s website, visitors are not allowed in all in-patient and out-patient care sites with the following expectations:

  • Pediatric patients under the age of 18 (limited to one visitor/companion 18 or older)
  • Neonatal ICU patients (limited to two visitors 18 or older, one at a time)
  • Compassionate care, including pastoral care visits and end-of-life patients (limited to one visitor 18 or older)
  • Laboring mothers (limited to one visitor 18 or older)
  • Patients requiring transportation home after an ED visit or outpatient visit or procedure (limited to one visitor/companion 18 or older)
  • In these exceptional cases patients and visitors will be screened for symptoms of COVID-19 or flu before being admitted.

Chicago signs Divvy deal to reduce bike rental fees

To help ease the burden of Illinois’ stay-at-home order, the City of Chicago has arranged a deal to reduce the cost of renting Divvy bikes.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s office announced today that the cost of an annual Divvy membership would be reduced 50% — from $99 to $49.50 — in a press release outlining a number of items that Chicago is taking to provide financial relief for transportation.

The “steeply” discounted memberships are available through April 30, 2020.

Other two-wheeled measures include reducing the regular $3 cost of 30-minute Divvy bike rentals by 66%, which comes out to a dollar for a half hour.

“Chicago is committed to ensuring reliable and accessible transportation for every neighborhood and community,” said the Mayor, “We are taking every measure possible to provide the pricing support needed to keep our residents mobile and our city moving forward.” 

Divvy is also launching a 30-day program to give critical healthcare workers free bikeshare rides.

Signing the Divvy deal is just one of several actions that the city has undertaken to help Chicago through the pandemic. Others include delaying the collection of certain fines and fees, continuing to operate the CTA’s regular service schedule; and working to create a subsidy for the taxi industry.

To learn more, click here.

CTA, Metra announce efforts to help ease COVID-19 burden

The Chicago Transit Authority today offered partial credit to customers who purchased fare cards but have been unable to use them due to the coronavirus.

“A one-time credit,” according to a CTA press release, applies to “any remaining days left on an active 7- or 30-day pass.” In other words, a person who purchased a 7-day pass but only used it for one day would be credited with six days of “Transit Value” that would be “added to the cardholder’s Ventra account.”

The CTA also offered reassurance that it will continue operations during the stay-at-home order.

“As people stay home and practice social distancing in response to COVID-19, we want you to know that CTA is continuing to run bus and rail service for those who need to get to critical jobs or need to travel for essential purposes.”

To receive a Transit Value credit, send an email to customerservice@ventrachicago.com with the following information no later than April 13, 2020:

  • Account holder’s name
  • Transit account ID number (12-digit code associated with your Ventra account, not your Ventra Card number)
  • Type of pass (7- or 30-day) for which a credit is being requested.

To see the full press release, click here.

For questions about Ventra cards and accounts, call 1.877.NOW.VENTRA or visit ventrachicago.com.

 

Metra offers medical personnel free rides during COVID crisis

Metra yesterday announced a plan to help people on the “front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.”

According to a press release issued by the agency, “doctors, nurses, EMTs, paramedics and other medical personnel … will now be able to ride free on Metra trains for the duration of the state’s ‘stay at home’ order.”

To ride free, medical personnel employed by a hospital, doctor’s office, medical facility or local fire department need only to present their work ID to a Metra conductor.

“We know it’s a small gesture but if it makes this all a little bit easier for these men and women who are bravely showing up at work every day and saving lives during this crisis, it’s the right thing to do,” said Metra CEO/Executive Director Jim Derwinski.

To read the full release, click here.

Chicago provides hotel rooms for people with coronavirus

People who test positive for coronavirus or are awaiting test results may be housed in hotel rooms rented by the city beginning today, according to a press release issued by Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s office.

Intended to “relieve unnecessary strain on hospitals and healthcare workers,” the measure will apply to those “who cannot safely return home (but) do not need hospital care.”

To date, the city has reached agreements with local hotels to provide more than 1,000 rooms for those “exposed to or mildly ill with COVID-19.” 

“I applaud the commitment and dedication of our city’s partner organizations as we work together to meet this moment brought by COVID-19 crisis,” said Mayor Lightfoot. “By working in tandem with healthcare experts and local organizations to increase capacity for those affected, we have been able to develop innovative solutions to ensure every resident – regardless of status or where they live – are able to obtain the care and refuge needed to prevent the spread of this disease and keep every Chicagoan safe and secure.”

According to a story published today in the Chicago Tribune, the program may expand to include up to 4,000 hotel rooms costing about $175 per night, and the expense will be covered by “federal funds and other potential sources.” 

Chicago Deputy Mayor of Neighborhood and Economic Development Samir Mayekar told the Tribune that the plan is a “pioneering model for the country.”

“It’s one of the first situations in any major city where we’ve actually worked out an agreement with a hotel operator, owner and the workers to help staff this type of agreement,” he explained.

The news comes four days after Governor Pritzker addressed the need for additional beds during a COVID-19 press conference on Thursday, March 19. These beds will help relieve the burden that the outbreak may place on hospitals.  

In his opening remarks, the governor announced that he had activated 13,000 National Guard troops. Referring to them as a “force of really extraordinary citizens,” he described their help in planning for the future.

“The Guard is also doing critical work planning for the weeks and months ahead,” he said, “including expanding our health care capacity by refitting and reopening previously closed hospitals.”

The comment inspired an attendee to enquire about capacity during the post-conference Q&A.

“We’re looking at what’s available now,” he said. “Then we’re looking at all of the available other opportunities for us to increase hospital beds.”

Governor Pritzker issues stay-at-home order to IL residents

Governor Pritzker has declared that all residents “will be subject to a stay-at-home order” beginning tomorrow at 5 p.m. and continuing until April 7. 

The announcement was made during the governor’s daily #COVID19 update at 3 p.m. today, which was also attended by Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

Governor Pritzker began by explaining that his “bedrock” for decision-making has been “to rely on science” while asking for “consequences to be laid out as clearly and starkly as possible.”

The resulting information, he continued, has led to an inescapable conclusion: “to avoid loss of lives, must enact an immediate stay-at-home order.”

Residents may leave their homes to purchase food and visit pharmacies, medical offices, hospitals, and gas stations, which will remain open. “There’s no need to rush out to grocery stores or gas stations,” the governor said. Activities like hiking and running are also permitted.

Law enforcement has been ordered “to monitor and take action when necessary,” for the duration of the order. Admitting that,  “we don’t have resources to police every individual’s behavior,” the governor encouraged Illinoisans to “work together to keep each other safe.” 

He also noted that some people will also continue going to work, especially those who contribute to the “fundamental building blocks that keep our lives steady” in industries such as agricultural, press, and infrastructure maintenance.

“The heroes of this moment are health care workers, first-responders, and the workers who keep our grocery stores and pharmacies running,” the governor said. “This is about the rest of us. We know this will be hard and we’re looking at every tool we have to help you through this crisis.”

To that end, Springfield is currently arranging safe daycare for the children of workers, ordering municipalities to halt all evictions, and making sure that school districts can continue to provide students with meals.

Chicago Mayor Lightfoot followed-up to explain how the city intends to support its residents through the stay-at-home order.

Actions currently underway to ease the burden include: finalizing quarantine and isolation locations, bolstering hospital capacity, relieving pressure on first-responders, and reinforcing the supply chain.

The Mayor also emphasized that “city services will not cease, the CTA will still run, and people can still go outside.” But, she added, parks and libraries will be closed beginning at 5 p.m. tomorrow and remain off-limits for the duration of the order.

After describing the process leading up to her decisions and acknowledging the hardship that they place upon residents, Mayor Lightfoot made a plea for support.

“This is a make or break moment: never in our lifetime has our own health been intertwined with the health of every person with whom we interact,” she said. “We should remain in contact with our families, friends, and neighbors.

Residents seeking up-to-date information on the situation may visit the Public Health Website: consult website chicago.gov/coronavirus or text COVID19 to 78015.

Governor Pritzker orders all restaurants closed for two weeks

To help reduce the spread of Coronavirus, Illinois bars and restaurants will be closed for in-person dining for two weeks beginning tomorrow — but drive-through and curbside pickup will continue to be allowed — Governor Pritzker announced this afternoon.

Referring to “the actions that the science and the experts say will keep people safe,” the Governor declared, “I am ordering all bars and restaurants in the State of Illinois to close to the public as of the close of business Monday night, March 16, through March 30.”

The Governor also added that, “we are working with restaurant owners and food delivery services across the state to see if restaurants can safely keep their kitchens open so the restaurants can continue food delivery to people at their homes.”

The order was made during a press conference attended by several city and state officials including Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, Illinois Restaurant Association President Sam Toya, and Illinois Department of Public Heath Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike, along with the Governor.

“There are no easy decisions left to make as we address this unprecedented crisis,” the Governor began. “Every choice that we face —every choice, now — is hard, and it comes with real consequences for our residents.”

A growing number of cancellations, delays, temporary prohibitions, and restricted uses have been issued in response to the global pandemic. They include gatherings of a thousand people or more, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, the start of the Cubs and White Sox seasons.

Beginning tomorrow, the James R. Thompson Center will be off limits for everything except official business.

Indicating that his staff would be work “around the clock” to sort out the logistical concerns of the two-week restaurant closures, Governor Pritzker explained that this particular “hard step” was necessary to “safeguard the health and safety of the citizens of the State of Illinois, and that requires urgent action.”

“I tried earlier this week to appeal to everyone’s good judgment to stay home,” he explained. “It’s unfortunate that many people didn’t take that seriously. The time for persuasion and public appeals is over. The time for action is here. This is not a joke. No one is immune to this.”

While acknowledging that the order will cause hardship for small businesses and provoke negative response, the Governor underscored his resolve to see it through.

“In some ways, my sincerest hope is that, when all of this is over, that we hear a whole bunch of complaints that the State overreacted and took action that was too aggressive,” he said. “That will have meant that we survived all of this with the best possible outcome: saving many peoples’ lives.”

By Daniel Patton, March 15, 2020

Crash victim on mission for safer Michigan Avenue

by Mat Cohen

On Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 10 a.m., Phyllis Mitzen walked with a cane along E. Delaware Place and across Michigan Avenue along with her husband, Michael. 

She’s on a mission to make cross- walks safer. 

Six months ago at this crossing, Mitzen was knocked to the ground by a van which rolled on her leg. She spent 15 hours in surgery, 10 days in the hospital and three months in rehabilitation.

On Dec. 16 she walked with a cane to the corner of Michigan and Delaware, meeting with 20 people and Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT)  official Samadi Malihe, to initiate a discussion about making the area safer. 

One of the women supporting the conversation was Janice Lewis. Her son was involved in an accident 10 years ago in Montgomery, Mich. When Lewis went to the hospital she didn’t recognize him.  He died Jan. 4, 2010.

“It changes lives,” she said. “So anything we can do, let’s do it.”

Since 2012 there has been an average of approximately 75 pedestrian deaths each year in Chicago, according to CDOT. The crossings along the Magnificent Mile between Oak Street and Chicago Avenue make the strip the third highest area for fatalities.

One of the main changes Mitzen is asking for is extended traffic lights to give slower walkers a chance to cross.

The group highlighted that slower people, mainly young kids and the elderly, have to start walking as soon as the light changes to have enough time to cross. But with busier intersections, cars try to get through the lights as late as they can, delaying pedestrians from crossing.

Mitzen serves as the president of Skyline Village Chicago and is a member of the Mayor’s Commission for Age Friendly Chicago. She’s also planning, along with State Representatives, a town hall meeting  in February at Ogden Elementary School to focus on pedestrian safety.

“I think they certainly heard what we  had to say,” she said. “And having (Alderman Brian Hopkins) come certainly  helped. We’re following up with a town hall meeting at the Ogden School and two state Reps. will come. We’ll ask for updates there.” 

She will also be asking for updates on the plan for Vision Zero, a strategy to eliminate traffic fatalities.

“It’s a worldwide initiative for an age friendly city,” Mitzen said. “Chicago is signed on and it’s not clear where they are with the plan.”

For more information on Vision Zero, visit chicago.gov  

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