Many avenues to help the homeless this season

By Jesse Wright | Staff Writer

Homeless people are a part of downtown.

When walking downtown, every street corner seems to include a cup outstretched, and every awning seems to cover a pile of ragged blankets sheltering a homeless person who may be in need of a helping hand this holiday season.

The Chicago Tribune reported over the summer that there may be over 4,000 homeless people in the city, with 1,500 of those living outdoors. During the winter months and at Christmastime especially, many may feel a need to do something—to offer a sandwich or a few bucks to a homeless person, to donate a few cans to a food pantry or to give their time or money to a charity. But what’s the best course of action?

“I’d like to adopt an all of the above approach,” said Michael Nameche, the director of development for the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, located on Lake Street near the New Eastside.

Since 1980, Nameche’s organization has worked to prevent and end homelessness in the city, and Nameche said he’s learned two things—that there is no one solution and that everyone can do something.

“[Homelessness is] a big problem, and so most homeless service agencies will accept help at whatever level someone can give,” he said. “If I were to make suggestions, there are choices. There is no wrong way. That’s the important thing. Some folks choose to donate money and that is very effective because it’s the most liquid of help so it can be addressed toward whatever is needed at the moment…Others like to donate their time and that is also very valuable.”

That said, Nameche compared volunteering to working out: It is most effective if people do it more than once. “When a nonprofit makes an investment in a volunteer, they like them to stick around for a while,” he said. “If you know you can’t sustain it for a while, maybe that’s not the best avenue.”

If you don’t think you can sign on to a long-term commitment, never fear; there are other options. One route, especially for groups like residential buildings and neighborhood organizations, is hosting a drive for clothing, food or money. “Drives for things that are needed are good; however, I think it’s always best to have a conversation with a local nonprofit to come up with someone that you know will be received well.,” Nameche said.

Nameche said sometimes nonprofits get surprised with a truckload of donations they don’t need or cannot use, and it can be hard to turn away someone’s genuine desire to help. “It’s terrible if someone brings you a shipment of hats and scarves if you’ve just got a whole bunch of hats and scarves,” he said.

Nameche said another benefit of talking to a local nonprofit is would-be donors may be inspired to collect things that would have never occurred to anyone. Nameche said donations like CTA passes could mean the difference between a job and unemployment for some homeless people.

“People of very modest means might not have a dime to them, but they might have to get across town to get to a doctor’s appointment or a job interview. Imagine if you have a job interview but you can’t get to it because you can’t get on the CTA,” Nameche said.

He also said a winter or holiday drive is a great start, but organizations that do routine work with local homeless nonprofits could make a real difference in their neighborhoods. This goes for individuals, too. “Much like going to the gym, it’s a good idea to establish relationships with an organization you feel a connection to because it’s doing good in your community,” he said.

Nameche said volunteers and organizations should feel free to shop around to find a good fit.

“Finding a good volunteer gig is like getting on the dating scene; you have to find a good match,” he explained. “Much like dating, you have to be patient, and you have to put yourself out there, and if the first time you contact a nonprofit and they don’t seem to jump on what you have to offer, don’t get discouraged just because it’s not the right fit.”

Nameche said there is something out there for every volunteer. Some nonprofits need volunteers in the evening as tutors, others need help during the daytime and some just need volunteers on the weekends. Volunteering could be a great way to help for retired residents and anyone on a fixed income who doesn’t want to make a financial commitment—especially those who have time during the day.

“If somebody is available during the day, that’s the rarest kind of volunteer,” Nameche said.

He said there are also groups, like his, where volunteers don’t even need to work directly with the homeless population, if that is a concern. Organizations like Coalition for the Homeless need volunteers to do simple office jobs. Volunteers could make a real difference “stuffing envelopes or doing office work so we don’t have to pay people to do that,” he said.

No matter what one does, it all makes a difference, Nameche said.

“Sometimes when people ask, ‘What can I do to help the homeless?’ What they’re asking is, ‘Should I give to people in the street?’ That’s a very personal decision and we don’t have a position on if it’s right to give to people on the street,” he said. “It’s right for some people. Some people carry cash, some people don’t. … Some people like that face–to-face interaction.

“If you’re troubled by seeing people on the street as most people should be, then come up with your own response. Just know that the best thing is to get folks who are in dire need of help connected to professional services. That’s sometimes something you don’t have time for, but you do have time to slip them a couple of bucks. It’s not wrong. But don’t be a cynic and find your response to that issue. It might be buying them a sandwich once a week or it might be volunteering once a week. Everybody has their own pathway, and if everybody did something, then the needle would move.”

Nameche said anyone who wants to get started finding a local nonprofit to get involved with can visit www.volunteermatch.org and see what is available close by. Visit www.chicagohomeless.org to find out more about the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless.

Cold weather, hot chocolate: Getting the most from your mug

By Taylor Hartz | Staff Writer

When the weather gets cold and the Christmas tunes start playing, nothing gets the body warm like a mug full of hot chocolate. For the best tastes, check out:

Hot Chocolate Bakery, 125 S. Clark St. (inside Revival Hall)

Start with the Medium for a basic milk chocolate flavor with a touch of caramel, then move on to the Dark, made of 72 percent dark chocolate. Mexican hot chocolate is also available at  $6 per cup. Drinks include a house-made marshmallow that takes up almost the whole mug and adds a milky sweetness as it melts. Adults can try the drink with cognac, whiskey, rum or brandy.

Ghiradelli 400 or 830 N. Michigan Ave.

At Ghirardelli, try the Lombard Street Hot Cocoa for $4.25—a cup of hot steamed milk served with four of the chocolate shop’s sweet milk chocolate and truffle squares to mix into your drink, or try the Sea Salt Caramel Hot Cocoa topped with whipped cream,swerved with milk chocolate caramel squares.

Dylan’s Candy Bar, 663 N. Michigan Ave.

Chocolate—hot or frozen—runs for $6, topped with whipped cream, hot fudge and mini marshmallows.

Bombo Bar, 832 W. Randolph St.

The West Loop’s hot spot’s “hotter chocolates” are overflowing with toppings and flavor. Snap some photos of these Instagram-worthy treats before you start sipping. The Hotter Chocolates, $9 each, come in two flavors—S’mores and Party Monster. The drinks may be spiked with Baileys, Stoli Vanilla Vodka, RumChata, Jameson or Grand Mariner for $8.

L.A. Burdick, 609 N. State St.

This 30-year-old New England chocolate shop and cafe has but one Midwestern location—and this is it. The Chicago shop opened in 2017, and though  they are known for their European chocolates, L.A. Burdick also offers a variety of hot cocoas—dark, milk, white or spicy—that start around $5.

John King, the December Doorperson of the Month for the New Eastside

By Elizabeth Czapski | Staff Writer

 

John King is a doorman at The Tides at Lakeshore East at 350 E. South Water St. – a job he worked his way up to earn. After working for a year as an overnight janitor at 400 E. South Water St., King applied to be a doorman at The Tides and was accepted, he said. That was nine years ago.

Since then, he has dedicated his career to the Tides –dealing with movers and deliveries each day, as well as greeting every resident who comes in the door.

“It makes a difference that they have a nice greeting in the morning and a pleasant smile, and I try to do that every morning,” he said.

King, 52, said the main reason he likes is job is the people he meets, especially the children in the building. He enjoys “just seeing them and how their lives are evolving, people that have children and watching them grow up, and just meeting so many people from so many different parts of the world is exciting as well.” he said.

King said The Tides has many “very nice” long-time residents and that he likes knowing that the families there feel like they can depend on him to take care of them. He’s successful, he said, because he’s a people person.

“You have to love people, and you have to love helping people, and I think that is what makes me good at my job,” he said.

His advice for aspiring hospitality workers is simple: have patience and kindness. He said sometimes people can be temperamental and it’s important to know how to deal with that as well as understand “sometimes people react differently when they’re in a situation that is unfamiliar to them,” he said.

“You have to be able to adapt, and that takes patience, and it’s always being kind. No matter what’s going on, you have to be kind because that can temper a lot of situations, and it can really calm a situation down and get the results that you need at that moment,” King said.

King said that when he’s not at work, he serves as a Christian minister teaching people the Bible.

 

To nominate your favorite doorperson, email info@neweastsidecommunity.com with the door person’s name and why you think they should be the doorperson of the month. Each winner will receive a $25 gift card to Mariano’s.

Waterfront penthouse makes a global splash as online tools upgrade buying experience

By Urban Real Estate

The New Eastside has become a cornerstone in the city of Chicago for luxury, elegance and community. The Chandler is no exception, bringing to life some of downtown’s most magnificent residences. Making news this month is a new listing at the coveted 450 E. Waterside address, unit 3001. This is a penthouse with a story that is attracting buyers from across the globe.

This premier 3,200-plus square foot residence has everything one could want in a dream home in the sky. Among its best assets are its permanent, unobstructed panoramic views of the Chicago River to the north, Navy Pier and Lake Michigan to the east, and the city’s skyline as far as the eye can see.

Matt Silver, partner/broker at Urban Real Estate, said, “This home’s meticulous interior design by the team at Ashworth & Associates, impressive state-of-the-art kitchen, 11-foot-high ceilings with floor-to-ceiling windows and with every inch customized with impeccable finishes and sweeping views makes this a show-stopper. The owners have left no detail to chance.” Silver added, “Our goal is to bring as much of our listing to life to a prospective buyer, leaving the guesswork out. We want them to love it before they even visit onsite.”

Aside from being impressive in layout and design, the three bedroom, three-and-a-half bathroom boasts a large foyer ready to greet guests when they walk in the door. Two car parking is included in the $2.75 million price tag. “It’s really the ultimate in city living,” Silver said.

Urban Real Estate strategically markets its properties using interactive online visual media to garner interest from prospective buyers around the world. Virtual property tours, along with guided video tours and strategic media efforts, help increase traffic and interest to a property, and often lead to offers from buyers reached via more tailored marketing methods.

Contact Matt Silver at Mattsilver@urbanre.com or call (312) 399-0017 for more information, or visit us at UrbanRealEstate.com to preview this listing. Or connect with any Urban broker who can show you just what you are missing at (312) 528-9200.

Just in time for Christmas, dino SUE gets a new home

Staff reports

SUE, the iconic T. rex who held the coveted spot on the Field Museum’s main floor until this past February, will finally be on display in a new home this holiday season.

The skeleton had been removed from Stanley Field Hall to make room for the museum’s new Titanosaur cast, Maximo, but on Dec. 21, SUE’s new suite will open, debuting a brand new habitat to museum visitors.

The biggest and most complete T. rex skeleton in the world, the skeleton that had been on display had, nevertheless, grown out of date given new scientific understanding of T. rex anatomy. So, since coming down, scientists and museum workers have been updating SUE’s skeleton to match the latest science.

One of those updates will be the addition of a set of bones across SUE’s abdomen called gastralia that helped the T. rex breathe, according to Pete Makovicky, the museum’s curator of dinosaurs.

SUE will now live in the Field Museum’s Griffin Halls of Evolving Planet, in a 5,100 square-foot suite filled with interactive displays that mimic the environment an actual T. rex would have lived in.

Among those displays will be “cutting-edge animations showing how SUE would have interacted with other dinosaurs and what the landscape would have looked like,” said Jaap Hoogstraten, Director of Exhibitions, in a press release.

The move has been in the works for quite some time, said Field Museum president Richard Lariviere, in a press release.

“We’re excited to finally complete our decades-long plan to put SUE in a proper scientific context alongside our other dinosaurs and offer an experience that really shows off why SUE is widely considered the greatest dinosaur fossil in the world,” said Lariviere in a press release.

SUE’s new environment “will give visitors a glimpse of the world SUE lived in,” said Hoogstraten in a press release. The new display will also explain how SUE made it to Chicago.

“People will also get to learn about SUE’s discovery and the things scientists have learned about SUE over the last few decades—there’ll be lots of new information and experiences that we weren’t able to get across with the old display,” said Hoogstraten, in a press release.

“This is the biggest, scariest, and most impressive SUE’s ever looked,” said Lariviere, in a press release.

New vet clinic opens next door to Mariano’s

By Stephanie Racine | Staff Writer

There’s a new doctor in the neighborhood for the furry and feathered members of the family. On Nov. 12, East Side Veterinary Clinic opened in the Village Market in New Eastside at 333 E. Benton Place, Suite 205.

The clinic is on the second floor, situated between Mariano’s and D&A Dermatology. It is an offshoot of South Loop Veterinary Hospital. East Side Vet is closed Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays, but they are open the rest of the week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. They offer several veterinary services including wellness checks and vaccinations.

Office Manager Dennis Kalup explained it took some time for South Loop Veterinary Hospital to find the perfect place for a new location, but is confident  it has found one in New Eastside.

Kalup explained he was familiar with the area due to a few current clients living in the area. “[We] could see that it was a vibrant community that loved their pets, and there would be a need for a clinic in that area,” Kalup said. Kalup and the rest of the staff at East Side Vet look forward to meeting their new clientele and becoming a fixture in the neighborhood.

For more information, visit myeastsidevet.com, where appointments can be requested virtually. The office can also be reached at (312) 753-5551.

 

CAPS officers give tips on reducing theft, talk about October shooting

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

CAPS Sgt. Anthony Dombrowski talks to a meeting of New Eastside residents in November. Photo by Jesse Wright

 

On Nov. 8, the First District CAPS program held its last meeting of the year.

According to the monthly data, thefts saw the biggest upward swing across the four beats in the district though aside from thefts, most other reported crimes ticked downward or stayed about the same.

CAPS Community Relations Officer Sgt. Anthony Dombrowski said a lot of the thefts are crime of opportunity and the sergeant spent time revisiting familiar ground, speaking to a handful of residents about various ways they could prevent being victims.

“People will be walking around with their cellphone in their hand,” Dombrowski said. “People have a habit of doing that, especially young people because they’re married to the device. … It’s easy to take it out of your hand. People can see you’re not aware as maybe you should be.”

He suggested people keep their valuables out of sight.

A resident asked the police whether kids selling candy—ostensibly for charity—along Michigan Avenue is legitimate. Dombrowski said that technically nobody is allowed to solicit along Michigan Avenue, but it’s also not a high priority for the police.

“Are a couple of 10-year-old kids selling candy on Michigan Avenue a criminal enterprise? Maybe, but we’re not focused on that,” Dombrowski said.

Another resident asked Dombrowski about a shooting in late October that on Saturday afternoon on Wabash. The sergeant said he believes the victim—who survived—was the intended target, though police also have no suspects and no motive for the attack because the victim said he has no idea why he was a target.

“We don’t know why the person was targeted or why he was shot,” Dombrowski said of the victim, a university student.

Dombrowski said it’s rare to have a shooting in downtown Chicago and even more rare to have one in the middle of the day while the streets are crowded with visitors and residents and because of that, he believes this was not a random attack.

“We have to start thinking about why,” Dombrowski said. “It’s unusual for someone to start shooting at one person.”

Dombrowski explained that if the shooting is indeed random, the shooter will hit multiple people in a crowd, and he used the Borderline Bar and Grill mass shooting in Thousand Oaks, California as an example of a random shooting incident.

“The kids are out at a bar; they’re having a good time and a guy comes in and starts shooting,” Dombrowski said. “And he shoots everybody. So why does he shoot one person? We have no idea.”

The sergeant also said the victim in the Wabash shooting might not have been honest with investigators.

“Quite often, the reason that the clearance rate on homicides is so low in Chicago is because we struggle to get cooperation from the victims,” Dombrowski said. “So sometimes they struggle to be completely honest with us.”

However, he said police are concerned with the Wabash shooting.

As ever, so-called bucket boys were again a topic of concern for residents. Each month residents complaint about the drummers who beat on makeshift drum kids in front of the Art Institute of Chicago on Michigan Avenue. In November, a woman said the drummers—a group that has permits to perform and which is popular among downtown visitors—annoys residents at night.

“There’s no easy solution and we have a whole city that supports them,” Dombrowski said.

There will be no CAPS meeting in December. The next CAPS meeting will be in Jan. 10 at 400 E. Randolph St. To keep up with district policing, follow them on Twiter at @ChicagoCAPS01.

Get gifts close to home: Shop the New Eastside

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

The New Eastside is home to museums, restaurants and retail merchandisers. With so much to choose from, it’s not hard to fill that Christmas list while shopping close to home. Here’s a glimpse at what’s available:

 

Graham Crackers Comic Books

This Chicago staple is home to all manner of comics and graphic novels. This holiday shopping season, the 77 E. Madison location is the place to get both familiar and newer titles.

The store is offering the first volume of Deadly Class for $9.99, which comes out in late November. The first volume of Saga is also out this fall for the same price.

Batman fans won’t want to miss Batman White Knight, a popular title wherein Batman reverses his role with the Joker and the villain becomes the hero, for $19.99.

Of local interest, fans of graphic novels can get Ironheart, a comic featuring Riri Williams, a hero straight from the streets of Chicago who develops her own Iron Man armor to combat villainy and save the city.

Also out this year is Skyward, a science-fiction title that begins in a Chicago of the future, when the earth is losing gravity and only the wealthy can afford to remain on the ground.

The store is also offering a variety of popular Japanese titles, including My Hero Academia.

The New Eastside Graham Crackers will have special offers and discounts for Black Friday, though specifics had not been announced by press time. The store is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. most days. For more information, call 312-629-1810

 

Fannie May

Fannie May is the place to go for holiday sweets, and New Eastside shoppers don’t have to go far to get the good stuff, with a store at 343 N. Michigan Ave.

The go-to treat is the Pixie, the store’s No. 1 seller since 1946. The treat combines caramel and pecans with milk chocolate and retails for $24.99 per pound. Of course the store also offers dark chocolate options, sweet and salty combinations, specialty items and unique assortments.

If Santa needs something a little different, Fannie May offers a variety of sweet stocking stuffers ranging from $5 to $20. The store is open most days from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, call 312-453-0010.

 

Blackhawks Store

Just as hockey season begins to heat up, the city’s favorite hockey team is offering a selection of merchandise for your favorite hockey fan this season. For men, try a fanatics rinkside adjustable for $30 or a 47B knit break cuff for $20. Or how about a jacket for $55? For women, there’s an Antigua cowl neck for $60, a drink bottle for $49 and a New Era knit cap for $26. Finally, for the little fans, check out the holiday plush bear for $25 or the NHL cap for $28 or a

NHL raglan shirt for $30. The store is open most days from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and is located at 333 N. Michigan Avenue. For more information, call 312-759-0079.

 

Get streetwise about the New Eastside: A look back at the story of our streets

By Elizabeth Czapski, Staff Writer

 

City streets can reveal a lot about a neighborhood’s history, and the streets in New Eastside are no exception.

Streetwise Chicago: A History of Chicago Street Names, a book by Don Hayner and Tom McNamee, offers a peek into the histories of street names in Chicago. Some are straightforward, while others are more colorful.

 

South Water Street

South Water Street, according to Streetwise Chicago, was at one time located along the river, where Wacker Drive is today. East South Water Street now runs east to west from North Harbor Drive, eventually merging with Wacker Drive.

The old South Water Street, according to Streetwise, was at one time the location of Chicago’s major market place, with numerous produce stalls. The produce market was relocated to 14th and Morgan in the 1920s when Wacker Drive was built.

 

Wacker Drive

According to Streetwise Chicago, Wacker Drive is named after Charles H. Wacker (1856–1929). He was a brewer, the chairman of the Chicago Plan Commission and director of the 1893 Columbian Exposition.

Wacker helped convince the city to preserve its lakefront and was involved in the development of Burnham and Bennett’s 1909 Plan of Chicago, which produced notable buildings such as the Field Museum and Union Station.

 

Stetson Avenue

Stetson Avenue, which runs north to south from East Wacker Drive to East Randolph Street,  along the eastern side of Prudential Plaza, is named after wealthy businessman Eugene W. Stetson (1882–1959).cording to Streetwise Chicago. Stetson began his professional life in Macon, Georgia, where he earned $40 a month as a bank clerk. He eventually rose to chairman of the executive committee of the Illinois Central Railroad and was a director of the Morgan Guaranty Trust Company. Stetson Avenue was built and named for him in 1955.

Moving the South Water Street Market and turning the street into a double-deck drive was Wacker’s idea.

 

Beaubien Court

North Beaubien Court runs north to south between East Lake Street and East Randolph Street, between Prudential Plaza and Michigan Avenue. It’s a short street with a long history behind its name.

 

According to an April 2017 DNAinfo story, Chicago’s second non-Native settler was a man named Jean Baptiste Beaubien — not to be confused with Chicago’s first non-Native settler, Jean Baptiste Point du Sable. Beaubien was born in Detroit and came to Chicago in 1804, left in 1812 after the battle of Fort Dearborn, and came back around 1817. He was an agent for the American Fur Company and his house was built where the Chicago Cultural Center now stands. Elections were held at his house and at one time he was the wealthiest man in the city.

But there was another, younger Beaubien — Mark, Jean Baptiste’s brother — and Streetwise Chicago makes clear both brothers were noteworthy in their own way. Mark Beaubien came to Chicago and opened the Sauganash Hotel in 1826 at the corner of Lake and Wacker.

“Beaubien would sit on his hotel’s front porch, surrounded by a few or more of his 23 children and shoot ducks on the Chicago River,” Streetwise reports. The younger Beaubien was also a ferryman, a fur trader, a heavy drinker and a “truly wicked fiddle player.”

The street is named for one — or both — of the Beaubien brothers.

 

A closer look at the Chicago Thanksgiving Parade

By Elizabeth Czapski, Staff Writer

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade has been bringing joy to residents for decades. The event started in 1934 as a way give people a little happiness during the Great Depression and this year’s parade promises to be as joy-filled and as fun as ever, with a few modern flourishes.

What’s new…

Viewers should tune in on time because right in the very first hour of the Uncle Dan’s Outdoor Store Thanksgiving Parade will feature a performance by the Black Ensemble Theater. The performing arts group will offer a preview performance of their “Women of Soul” production, which runs through Jan. 13. The performance will include a special salute to Aretha Franklin as well as a celebration of some of the biggest stars of soul.

What’s returning…

Every parade features familiar balloons, floats and music. But how many have Wookies?

Yes, the The 501st Legion – Midwest Garrison is back again. In late October parade officials announced the return of the largest Star Wars costuming club in the area.

The star warriors will be joined in the parade by another group of relics—knights. Returning this year will be Medieval Times’ Knights of the Realm.

Also returning is the The Southland College Prep band, a college band that formed in 2010. The band has grown in recent years and is now considered one of the premier marching bands in the parade, boasting 100 members with 25 dancers to boot.

Speaking of bands, local favorite Kelly High School Marching Trojans will return to perform their 2018 winter festival show.

The grand marshal…

While this year’s grand marshal had not been announced by press time, Chicagoans and parade fans can expect the marshal to be beloved and a part of the city’s history. Past marshals have included Ronald McDonald (2017) (the company is headquartered in Chicago),Chicago native and actor Matt Walsh (2016) and Chicago native and wrestler CM Punk (2012).

For a complete list of what to expect, check out the parade website, www.chicagothanksgivingparade.com.

Behind the scenes…

Of course, there is more to the parade than the floats and smiles most people see. Amanda Caswell, who does public relations for the Chicago Thanksgiving Parade, provided some of the parade’s fun facts. Here’s a look behind the scenes at the parade:

In 2014, 400,000 people attended the parade — that’s almost equivalent to the entire population of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

That year, 2,500 gift bags were handed out.

There are 5,280 feet in the parade route, which is exactly one mile.

It’s a global phenomenon with 19 states, 16 countries and 23 different cultural groups were represented in the 2014 parade, making it a true international affair. Thanks to television coverage, the parade is annually available to approximately 80 million homes and viewed by millions around the world. In addition, many visitors come from around the world, from places like Switzerland, Mexico, Australia, Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Canada and beyond.

According to media reports of last year’s parade, there were around 5,000 parade participants, 1,300 volunteers, 15 floats of all kinds and 18 marching bands, according to numbers from Thrillist, the Chicago Tribune, and Patch.com.

Finally, about 200 people handled the parade’s balloons in the 2014 parade, and those balloons were filled with 39,500 cubic feet of helium.

For the record, in 2014 there were 70 members of the “poo crew,” who ensure State Street would not smell like manure after the parade was over.

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade will take place on Nov. 22, 8–11 a.m. on State Street from Congress to Randolph. Don’t want to leave the house? Anyone can watch the parade live on WGN America and WGN9.

If you go…

Leave early and plan well. Streets will be blocked off for the parade route and parking will be tough, so give yourself lots of time. Public transportation will be running, though on a holiday schedule so if you take a train, check the schedule.

If you want a front row seat on State Street, good luck and set the alarm. It’s best to arrive by 7 a.m. to claim a spot, though there are usually spaces near State and Van Buren not too far from the Harold Washington Library. Expect train noise around that area.

 

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade provided statistics from the 2014 event. Updated stats will be available after this year’s parade.

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