New vet clinic opens next door to Mariano’s

By Stephanie Racine | Staff Writer

There’s a new doctor in the neighborhood for the furry and feathered members of the family. On Nov. 12, East Side Veterinary Clinic opened in the Village Market in New Eastside at 333 E. Benton Place, Suite 205.

The clinic is on the second floor, situated between Mariano’s and D&A Dermatology. It is an offshoot of South Loop Veterinary Hospital. East Side Vet is closed Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays, but they are open the rest of the week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. They offer several veterinary services including wellness checks and vaccinations.

Office Manager Dennis Kalup explained it took some time for South Loop Veterinary Hospital to find the perfect place for a new location, but is confident  it has found one in New Eastside.

Kalup explained he was familiar with the area due to a few current clients living in the area. “[We] could see that it was a vibrant community that loved their pets, and there would be a need for a clinic in that area,” Kalup said. Kalup and the rest of the staff at East Side Vet look forward to meeting their new clientele and becoming a fixture in the neighborhood.

For more information, visit myeastsidevet.com, where appointments can be requested virtually. The office can also be reached at (312) 753-5551.

 

CAPS officers give tips on reducing theft, talk about October shooting

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

CAPS Sgt. Anthony Dombrowski talks to a meeting of New Eastside residents in November. Photo by Jesse Wright

 

On Nov. 8, the First District CAPS program held its last meeting of the year.

According to the monthly data, thefts saw the biggest upward swing across the four beats in the district though aside from thefts, most other reported crimes ticked downward or stayed about the same.

CAPS Community Relations Officer Sgt. Anthony Dombrowski said a lot of the thefts are crime of opportunity and the sergeant spent time revisiting familiar ground, speaking to a handful of residents about various ways they could prevent being victims.

“People will be walking around with their cellphone in their hand,” Dombrowski said. “People have a habit of doing that, especially young people because they’re married to the device. … It’s easy to take it out of your hand. People can see you’re not aware as maybe you should be.”

He suggested people keep their valuables out of sight.

A resident asked the police whether kids selling candy—ostensibly for charity—along Michigan Avenue is legitimate. Dombrowski said that technically nobody is allowed to solicit along Michigan Avenue, but it’s also not a high priority for the police.

“Are a couple of 10-year-old kids selling candy on Michigan Avenue a criminal enterprise? Maybe, but we’re not focused on that,” Dombrowski said.

Another resident asked Dombrowski about a shooting in late October that on Saturday afternoon on Wabash. The sergeant said he believes the victim—who survived—was the intended target, though police also have no suspects and no motive for the attack because the victim said he has no idea why he was a target.

“We don’t know why the person was targeted or why he was shot,” Dombrowski said of the victim, a university student.

Dombrowski said it’s rare to have a shooting in downtown Chicago and even more rare to have one in the middle of the day while the streets are crowded with visitors and residents and because of that, he believes this was not a random attack.

“We have to start thinking about why,” Dombrowski said. “It’s unusual for someone to start shooting at one person.”

Dombrowski explained that if the shooting is indeed random, the shooter will hit multiple people in a crowd, and he used the Borderline Bar and Grill mass shooting in Thousand Oaks, California as an example of a random shooting incident.

“The kids are out at a bar; they’re having a good time and a guy comes in and starts shooting,” Dombrowski said. “And he shoots everybody. So why does he shoot one person? We have no idea.”

The sergeant also said the victim in the Wabash shooting might not have been honest with investigators.

“Quite often, the reason that the clearance rate on homicides is so low in Chicago is because we struggle to get cooperation from the victims,” Dombrowski said. “So sometimes they struggle to be completely honest with us.”

However, he said police are concerned with the Wabash shooting.

As ever, so-called bucket boys were again a topic of concern for residents. Each month residents complaint about the drummers who beat on makeshift drum kids in front of the Art Institute of Chicago on Michigan Avenue. In November, a woman said the drummers—a group that has permits to perform and which is popular among downtown visitors—annoys residents at night.

“There’s no easy solution and we have a whole city that supports them,” Dombrowski said.

There will be no CAPS meeting in December. The next CAPS meeting will be in Jan. 10 at 400 E. Randolph St. To keep up with district policing, follow them on Twiter at @ChicagoCAPS01.

Get gifts close to home: Shop the New Eastside

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

The New Eastside is home to museums, restaurants and retail merchandisers. With so much to choose from, it’s not hard to fill that Christmas list while shopping close to home. Here’s a glimpse at what’s available:

 

Graham Crackers Comic Books

This Chicago staple is home to all manner of comics and graphic novels. This holiday shopping season, the 77 E. Madison location is the place to get both familiar and newer titles.

The store is offering the first volume of Deadly Class for $9.99, which comes out in late November. The first volume of Saga is also out this fall for the same price.

Batman fans won’t want to miss Batman White Knight, a popular title wherein Batman reverses his role with the Joker and the villain becomes the hero, for $19.99.

Of local interest, fans of graphic novels can get Ironheart, a comic featuring Riri Williams, a hero straight from the streets of Chicago who develops her own Iron Man armor to combat villainy and save the city.

Also out this year is Skyward, a science-fiction title that begins in a Chicago of the future, when the earth is losing gravity and only the wealthy can afford to remain on the ground.

The store is also offering a variety of popular Japanese titles, including My Hero Academia.

The New Eastside Graham Crackers will have special offers and discounts for Black Friday, though specifics had not been announced by press time. The store is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. most days. For more information, call 312-629-1810

 

Fannie May

Fannie May is the place to go for holiday sweets, and New Eastside shoppers don’t have to go far to get the good stuff, with a store at 343 N. Michigan Ave.

The go-to treat is the Pixie, the store’s No. 1 seller since 1946. The treat combines caramel and pecans with milk chocolate and retails for $24.99 per pound. Of course the store also offers dark chocolate options, sweet and salty combinations, specialty items and unique assortments.

If Santa needs something a little different, Fannie May offers a variety of sweet stocking stuffers ranging from $5 to $20. The store is open most days from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, call 312-453-0010.

 

Blackhawks Store

Just as hockey season begins to heat up, the city’s favorite hockey team is offering a selection of merchandise for your favorite hockey fan this season. For men, try a fanatics rinkside adjustable for $30 or a 47B knit break cuff for $20. Or how about a jacket for $55? For women, there’s an Antigua cowl neck for $60, a drink bottle for $49 and a New Era knit cap for $26. Finally, for the little fans, check out the holiday plush bear for $25 or the NHL cap for $28 or a

NHL raglan shirt for $30. The store is open most days from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and is located at 333 N. Michigan Avenue. For more information, call 312-759-0079.

 

Get streetwise about the New Eastside: A look back at the story of our streets

By Elizabeth Czapski, Staff Writer

 

City streets can reveal a lot about a neighborhood’s history, and the streets in New Eastside are no exception.

Streetwise Chicago: A History of Chicago Street Names, a book by Don Hayner and Tom McNamee, offers a peek into the histories of street names in Chicago. Some are straightforward, while others are more colorful.

 

South Water Street

South Water Street, according to Streetwise Chicago, was at one time located along the river, where Wacker Drive is today. East South Water Street now runs east to west from North Harbor Drive, eventually merging with Wacker Drive.

The old South Water Street, according to Streetwise, was at one time the location of Chicago’s major market place, with numerous produce stalls. The produce market was relocated to 14th and Morgan in the 1920s when Wacker Drive was built.

 

Wacker Drive

According to Streetwise Chicago, Wacker Drive is named after Charles H. Wacker (1856–1929). He was a brewer, the chairman of the Chicago Plan Commission and director of the 1893 Columbian Exposition.

Wacker helped convince the city to preserve its lakefront and was involved in the development of Burnham and Bennett’s 1909 Plan of Chicago, which produced notable buildings such as the Field Museum and Union Station.

 

Stetson Avenue

Stetson Avenue, which runs north to south from East Wacker Drive to East Randolph Street,  along the eastern side of Prudential Plaza, is named after wealthy businessman Eugene W. Stetson (1882–1959).cording to Streetwise Chicago. Stetson began his professional life in Macon, Georgia, where he earned $40 a month as a bank clerk. He eventually rose to chairman of the executive committee of the Illinois Central Railroad and was a director of the Morgan Guaranty Trust Company. Stetson Avenue was built and named for him in 1955.

Moving the South Water Street Market and turning the street into a double-deck drive was Wacker’s idea.

 

Beaubien Court

North Beaubien Court runs north to south between East Lake Street and East Randolph Street, between Prudential Plaza and Michigan Avenue. It’s a short street with a long history behind its name.

 

According to an April 2017 DNAinfo story, Chicago’s second non-Native settler was a man named Jean Baptiste Beaubien — not to be confused with Chicago’s first non-Native settler, Jean Baptiste Point du Sable. Beaubien was born in Detroit and came to Chicago in 1804, left in 1812 after the battle of Fort Dearborn, and came back around 1817. He was an agent for the American Fur Company and his house was built where the Chicago Cultural Center now stands. Elections were held at his house and at one time he was the wealthiest man in the city.

But there was another, younger Beaubien — Mark, Jean Baptiste’s brother — and Streetwise Chicago makes clear both brothers were noteworthy in their own way. Mark Beaubien came to Chicago and opened the Sauganash Hotel in 1826 at the corner of Lake and Wacker.

“Beaubien would sit on his hotel’s front porch, surrounded by a few or more of his 23 children and shoot ducks on the Chicago River,” Streetwise reports. The younger Beaubien was also a ferryman, a fur trader, a heavy drinker and a “truly wicked fiddle player.”

The street is named for one — or both — of the Beaubien brothers.

 

A closer look at the Chicago Thanksgiving Parade

By Elizabeth Czapski, Staff Writer

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade has been bringing joy to residents for decades. The event started in 1934 as a way give people a little happiness during the Great Depression and this year’s parade promises to be as joy-filled and as fun as ever, with a few modern flourishes.

What’s new…

Viewers should tune in on time because right in the very first hour of the Uncle Dan’s Outdoor Store Thanksgiving Parade will feature a performance by the Black Ensemble Theater. The performing arts group will offer a preview performance of their “Women of Soul” production, which runs through Jan. 13. The performance will include a special salute to Aretha Franklin as well as a celebration of some of the biggest stars of soul.

What’s returning…

Every parade features familiar balloons, floats and music. But how many have Wookies?

Yes, the The 501st Legion – Midwest Garrison is back again. In late October parade officials announced the return of the largest Star Wars costuming club in the area.

The star warriors will be joined in the parade by another group of relics—knights. Returning this year will be Medieval Times’ Knights of the Realm.

Also returning is the The Southland College Prep band, a college band that formed in 2010. The band has grown in recent years and is now considered one of the premier marching bands in the parade, boasting 100 members with 25 dancers to boot.

Speaking of bands, local favorite Kelly High School Marching Trojans will return to perform their 2018 winter festival show.

The grand marshal…

While this year’s grand marshal had not been announced by press time, Chicagoans and parade fans can expect the marshal to be beloved and a part of the city’s history. Past marshals have included Ronald McDonald (2017) (the company is headquartered in Chicago),Chicago native and actor Matt Walsh (2016) and Chicago native and wrestler CM Punk (2012).

For a complete list of what to expect, check out the parade website, www.chicagothanksgivingparade.com.

Behind the scenes…

Of course, there is more to the parade than the floats and smiles most people see. Amanda Caswell, who does public relations for the Chicago Thanksgiving Parade, provided some of the parade’s fun facts. Here’s a look behind the scenes at the parade:

In 2014, 400,000 people attended the parade — that’s almost equivalent to the entire population of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

That year, 2,500 gift bags were handed out.

There are 5,280 feet in the parade route, which is exactly one mile.

It’s a global phenomenon with 19 states, 16 countries and 23 different cultural groups were represented in the 2014 parade, making it a true international affair. Thanks to television coverage, the parade is annually available to approximately 80 million homes and viewed by millions around the world. In addition, many visitors come from around the world, from places like Switzerland, Mexico, Australia, Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Canada and beyond.

According to media reports of last year’s parade, there were around 5,000 parade participants, 1,300 volunteers, 15 floats of all kinds and 18 marching bands, according to numbers from Thrillist, the Chicago Tribune, and Patch.com.

Finally, about 200 people handled the parade’s balloons in the 2014 parade, and those balloons were filled with 39,500 cubic feet of helium.

For the record, in 2014 there were 70 members of the “poo crew,” who ensure State Street would not smell like manure after the parade was over.

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade will take place on Nov. 22, 8–11 a.m. on State Street from Congress to Randolph. Don’t want to leave the house? Anyone can watch the parade live on WGN America and WGN9.

If you go…

Leave early and plan well. Streets will be blocked off for the parade route and parking will be tough, so give yourself lots of time. Public transportation will be running, though on a holiday schedule so if you take a train, check the schedule.

If you want a front row seat on State Street, good luck and set the alarm. It’s best to arrive by 7 a.m. to claim a spot, though there are usually spaces near State and Van Buren not too far from the Harold Washington Library. Expect train noise around that area.

 

The Chicago Thanksgiving Parade provided statistics from the 2014 event. Updated stats will be available after this year’s parade.

New takes on the Thanksgiving table

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

 

Thanksgiving does not have to consist of the same canned cranberry sauce, cornucopia and bread stuffing every November. This year, throw out the rulebook and use these tips to augment your favorite holiday classics.  

Lighter dishes

Staying on the lighter side of Thanksgiving can be satisfying. Try adding cauliflower to stuffing in lieu of bread or rice. For vegan guests, swap out animal byproducts for lentils or chickpeas in a stuffing-type side dish. Sweet potatoes are a good substitute for regular potatoes in mashed, baked, or fried forms, while butternut squash soup is a light and classically-inspired alternative to heavier side dishes.

Cultural additions

For extra flavor, try adding a cultural twist to Thanksgiving favorites. A chile rub on the turkey can give your bird a Southwestern kick, while pumpkin egg rolls or turkey dumplings can make great finger foods. For a simpler option, add a dish from a favorite international cuisine: carbonara, stuffed grape leaves, rice pilaf and spring rolls all fit in with Thanksgiving mainstays.

Fun with pumpkins

Pumpkins aren’t just for Halloween. Spray paint pumpkins gold, white or silver for a unique addition to a table or decoration. Painting the menu on a pumpkin is a bold way to announce what will be on the table. Mini pumpkins can be used as seat markers or to denote what cheeses are on a cheese plate. Add flowers and glitter or string lights to pumpkins for an extra dimension.

Say goodbye to turkey

For the main course, consider going with a Midwestern classic like a  honey baked ham, and make your stuffing with a meat such as lamb or beef. A pescatarian Thanksgiving could feature lobster or salmon with a cranberry sauce. Or get rid of the meat altogether for a vegetarian spread – mushroom and chestnut “beef” Wellington can substitute turkey for a vegan main dish.

Reilly nixes Spire for now over community concerns

Staff reports

After months of speculation, Chicago Alderman Brendan Reilly rejected the 400 N. Lake Shore Drive development, also known as the Spire Site.

In late October, Reilly announced that he would reject the proposal after the developers failed to consider any community concerns. This is a setback for a development that has been in the works for over a decade, but it does not mean the project is dead.

“As you know, I joined with SOAR to host a community meeting on May 15 to review the developer’s proposal,” Reilly wrote in an email to constituents. “The meeting was very well attended and we received a tremendous amount of community feedback. My staff catalogued all of the community input from that meeting and we created a list of priority issues that needed to be addressed during my negotiation process with the developer.”

Reilly said he sent the developer a “detailed memo” in August enumerating community concerns, and that their reply did not address any of those issues.

 

“Unfortunately, several weeks later, Related Midwest provided me with a response that did not adequately address any of the major concerns about their proposal,” he wrote.

Reilly said the community had concerns about the hotel use, the tall podium base of the buildings, traffic concerns and security concerns along the Riverwalk and at DuSable Park.

However, the alderman said the project is not dead because Related Midwest may still address the issues at some point in the future, allowing development to move forward.

“In the event the developer chooses to address the legitimate concerns regarding their proposal, my office will be sure to provide all impacted neighbors with an update,” he said.

Reilly then listed exactly what must be addressed.

  • Access to the site via East North Water Street must be significantly restricted
  • Proposed hotel use should be eliminated
  • Podium height and bulk must be reduced
  • Make greater use of the Lake Shore Drive access ramp system and below grade parking system to manage deliveries, services vehicles and pick-up/drop-offs.
  • Developer must assemble a security plan for the Riverwalk and DuSable Park
  • Elimination of the proposed Ogden Slip Public Esplanade

 

No ‘paws’ in winter fun for Fido: Indoor activities for your dog

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

 

Doggy Paddle

Doggy Paddle, 1430 W. Willow St., has indoor pools for pups, allowing your four-legged friends to get some aquatic exercise even when the lake is frozen over. Swimming for dogs has many physical and psychological benefits, including improved flexibility and mobility and reduced stress and anxiety, according to Doggy Paddle. where, dogs can swim privately, or in groups based on temperament and experience. An instructor is always present while dogs are in the pool. In the new member pool, the instructor will help guide furry friends. Private swimming lessons are also available. Doggy Paddle also has an indoor dog park, use of which is included with a swim. Vaccinations are required and unneutered dogs can be booked for private swims only. Prices begin at $32 for group swims. For more information, visit doggypaddle.com

K9University

K9University, 2945 W Lake St., has an indoor open-play, climate-controlled dog park, open 9–11 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday that allows your dogs to get out all their energy on winter weekends. To use the park, customers pay $15 for the first dog, with $8 for any additional dogs in the family. Staff is on hand at all times, but owners are encouraged to watch and learn what safe play between dogs looks like, according to K9University’s website. The space is also available for private reservations to throw a puppy birthday party or get-together. K9University recommends checking its calendar for special events or a specific pup party. Vaccinations are required. K9U also features boarding, training and daycare. For more information, visit k9uchicago.com

See Spot shop…

Running errands with a pup can kill two birds with one stone by giving your dog some exercise while you knock things off your to-do list. Certain stores and shops welcome pets in downtown Chicago, so you can bring your buddy along with you. Besides pet stores such as PetSmart or Kriser’s, The Shops at North Bridge, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Bloomingdale’s, at 900 N. Michigan Ave., are pet friendly. Be sure to enter in the Walton entrance for Bloomingdale’s, as the rest of the mall does not allow dogs. Other stores that allow dogs include LUSH, Restoration Hardware, Anthropologie and the Apple Store.

Open for business: Downtown Chicago hotels booming

The Hotel Julian includes a new eatery, About Last Knife. Courtesy photo.

By Stephanie Racine, Staff Writer

 

Downtown Chicago is booming for hotels. In the last month, the Hotel Julian opened in the New Eastside while in the Streeterville area, Aloft opened a new hotel and the Red Roof Inn opened the St. Clair Hotel.

These properties offer hundreds of new rooms for city visitors, along with luxury and easy access to all the downtown amenities.

The Hotel Julian, which opened Oct. 1 at 168 N. Michigan Ave., the corner of Michigan and Randolph, features 218 rooms, with millennium kings and double rooms.

“St. Julian is the patron saint of hospitality, so that is where the name comes from,” said George Jordan, Executive VP with Oxford Hotels and Resorts, the owners and operators of Hotel Julian.

The name of the hotel’s restaurant, About Last Knife, offers an all-day menu.

“You can get an omelet in the morning or at night, or beef Wellington by the slice in the morning or at night,” Jordan said. The hotel pays tribute to the building’s original proprietors Benjamin Marshall and Charles Fox of the eponymous Marshall and Fox architectural firm, with Marshall’s image on the restaurant’s wall.

In Streeterville, Aloft Chicago Mag Mile opened Oct. 1, at 243 E. Ontario St.

Aloft is a Marriott Hotel brand, and Tishman is the developer, owner and manager. There are 337 guest rooms and a restaurant, according to their website. The hotel takes inspiration from the site’s former occupant, the Chicago Contemporary Museum of Art.

Additionally, the Red Roof Inn opened the St. Clair Hotel on Oct. 1, at 162 E. Ontario, as a part of their upscale Red Collection hotels.

 

For more information about the Hotel Julian, call 312-346-1200 or visit www.hoteljulianchicago.com/

 

For more information about Aloft Chicago Mag Mile, call 312-429-6600 or visit

www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/chiaa-aloft-chicago-mag-mile/

 

For more information about the St. Clair Hotel, call 312-787-3580 or visit www.redroof.com/property/il/chicago/RRI281

New Eastside Doorperson of the Month: John Echevarria transforms a condo into a home

John Echevarria transforms a condo into a home. Courtesy photo

By Jesse Wright, Staff Writer

 

John Echevarria, doorperson at the 340 E. Randolph St. Condos, is a people person.

He would have to be —  he’s been at the Randolph St. residence since April 2010, and has been a  doorman for more than a decade.

“The 340 condos are, by far, the best condos I’ve ever been in,” Echevarria said. “The staff, the residents and my boss in particular, she is such a great leader. I’ve learned quite a bit from her in the five or six years she’s been at the building. My growth has [been] multiplied in the powers of ten. My knowledge has exponentially gone up since she’s been here.”

Echevarria said the most important thing he’s learned is leadership skills. He hopes to continue in the service industry as a leader and he is learning how to do that on the job. His role there is nothing short of professional development.

“I’ve learned a lot of leadership qualities,” Echevarria said. “I’m the head doorman here and my boss, she’s showed me how to be a leader, how to train the staff to better themselves and how to provide better customer service for the residents. My ultimate goal is to go into management and she’s given me a lot of management tasks. All of that has helped me prepare to go into management.”

The job-training aside, Echevarria said he residents who motivate him to go to work each day – this love for human interaction is what got Echevarria nominated for Doorperson of the Month and why he excels at his job.

“You have to be customer-service oriented,” he said. “You need to love working with people. You want to be customer- and security-oriented. You want to feel, when you come to work, that it’s also your home.”

A good doorperson has to treat the resident families like part of his or her own family and the property as an extension of the doorperson’s own residence, Echevarria explained. A good doorperson can’t let in just anyone, but they can’t act like a bouncer, either.

“You want to screen people who come in, politely,” Echevarria said. “Your job is to know how to treat this like it’s your home.”

Residents, he said, notice this and it makes them feel more at home in the condo.

“When you have confidence in your door staff, that makes your living environment that much more enjoyable,” Echevarria said.

As Echevarria makes the condos more of a home and treats residents like family, they, too, get to know him and make him almost a part of their family.

As a doorperson, Echevarria watches children grow up and families get larger — and he loves it.

“A lot of these residents have watched me grow and become a father,” Echevarria said. He became a father in 2013 and now has two daughters.

Between being a service industry professional, a husband and the father of two girls, Echevarria said he’s got his hands full of families.

“I’ve got two girls now,” he said. “One’s going to be 5 and one’s going to be a year and I have a beautiful, wonderful wife who takes care of the kids when I am at work. I get a few date nights here and there, but it’s all about work and family right now.”

 

To nominate your favorite doorperson, email info@neweastsidecommunity.com with the door person’s name and why you think they should be the doorperson of the month. Each winner will receive a $25 gift card to Mariano’s.

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